MANA-SRM pipeline and its application in personalized cancer therapeutics.

NEW YORK – Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a targeted mass spec method for measuring cancer-linked neoantigens.

Described in a study published last month in Cancer Immunology Research, the method could prove useful both for studying tumor immunology and in the development of personalized cancer immunotherapies, said Qing Wang, first author on the paper and founder and CEO of clinical omics firm Complete Omics.

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SAFE-SRM, 1st pipeline for clinical proteomics

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Researchers in the lab of Johns Hopkins University professor Bert Vogelstein have identified a pair of potential peptide biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

Described in a study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the markers stem from efforts by the lab, which had traditionally focused on cancer genomics, to move more seriously into the proteomic and protein biomarker space, said Qing Wang, a faculty member in Vogelstein’s lab and first author on the study.

The peptide markers were validated using a selected-reaction monitoring system developed by Wang and his colleagues that uses light-labeled peptides and extensive fractionation to enable highly sensitive and reproducible quantitation of candidate biomarkers in plasma.

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Collaboration with Dr. Bert Vogelstein in JHU

Feb 26, 2019 | BALTIMORE –  Complete Omics’ Clinical Proteomics team announced a collaboration with Dr. Bert Vogelstein and his Ludwig center in Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine on a variety of molecular diagnostics projects.

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Collaboration with UMBC

Feb 10, 2019 | BALTIMORE –  Complete Omics and UMBC announced a collaboration to leverage our unique expertise in multi-omics diagnostics for a continuous education and training of UMBC students. 

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MT-SRM, direct detection of mutant proteins as cancer-specific biomarkers

Cancer biomarkers are currently the subject of intense research because of their potential utility for diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted therapy. In theory, the gene products resulting from somatic mutations are the ultimate protein biomarkers, being not simply associated with tumors but actually responsible for tumorigenesis. In 2010, we developed the 1st pipeline for detecting and quantifying mutant protein as cancer specific biomarkers from human specimens, and it received a broad range of attentions from different disciplines of biomedical sciences [Ref. 1].

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