Introduction:

Epigenetic research involves examining the mitotically heritable processes that regulate gene expression, independent of changes in the DNA sequence. Recent technical advances such as whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and affordable epigenomic array-based technologies, allow researchers to measure epigenetic profiles of large cohorts at a genome-wide level, generating comprehensive high-dimensional datasets that may contain important information for disease development and treatment opportunities.

Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing (WGBS) is used for detecting methylated cytosines by treating the DNA with sodium bisulfite before sequencing. WGBS is currently considered as the gold standard for studying genome-wide methylation at single base resolution. Methylome analysis is a valuable way to do a range of researches, including studies on gene regulation, cell differentiation, aging, tumorigenesis and phenotypic diversity.

In a NGS seqeuncing project, particular Methyl-Seq, it is very common to fall into the situation of being lack of enough materials for sequencing. Samples that are collected for deep study, such as NGS sequencing, are usually precious with very limited amount available. Sometimes, you have enough materials to start with, however, after several rounds of library preparations, you still can not get NGS datasets with desired quality, and now only very few samples are left for further test. It is the time to contact Complete Omics and learn more about our MyGene™-UltimateSens™ NGS technology, a NGS library construction method WITHOUT EXCESSIVE PCR AMPLIFICATION.

Sample types we accept:

1, Purified DNA samples

2, Cell Lysates and Tissue Lysates

3, Biofluids, such as plasma*, serum*, saliva, tear, etc.

4, FFPE slide/ FFPE extract

5, Fossil

6, Customized sample types (please contact us to discuss)

Collaboration with Baylor College of Medicine

Jan 19, 2022 | BALTIMORE –  Complete Omics’ Clinical Proteomics team announced a collaboration with Professor Andras Attila Heczey and his team from Baylor College of Medicine on a clinical proteomics…

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Collaboration with Washington University in St. Louis

Jan 12, 2022 | BALTIMORE –  Complete Omics’ Clinical Proteomics team announced a collaboration with Professor Marco Sardiello and his team from Washington University in St. Louis on a clinical proteomics…

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Happy Holidays from Complete Omics!

December 23, 2021 | BALTIMORE – Dear Team Members and Friends: 2021 has been an exciting year for Complete Omics – – we brought dramatic improvements to biomedical sciences and…

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